Tagged Devon

John Fowles with James Crowden

The novelist who came for tea

I was in a bookshop in Ilminster, Paragon Books, the one that was owned by Chris Chapman, who also owned the bookshop in Lyme Regis, Serendip. Sadly Chris is no longer with us, but both bookshops are still flourishing. He passionately believed in local authors and local books. I got on well with Chris and so I waved a manuscript under his nose, something I had written about poetry and farm labouring: sheep shearing, night lambing, forestry and cider making. This was back in the summer of 1991. A lot of cider and sheep have gone under the bridge since then.

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The Hag of the Land by Jade Moon

Are You Ready to Meet the Hag of the Land?

Storytellers from the Wood Sisters in Totnes will be performing versions of the “loathly lady” myth at Bridport Arts Centre’s Story Café on 24 July, 7:30pm.

Lisa Schneidau, Ronnie Conboy, Sue Charman and musician Laura Salmon have spent many years working with myth and music in the belief that stories can change our lives.

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Splitting the Issue: Scones or Buns for Cream Teas?

Splitting the Issue: Scones or Buns, for Cream Teas?

In Cornwall, a cream tea was traditionally served with Cornish splits rather than scones. Cornish splits are little yeast-leavened bread rolls, they are split when still warm and first buttered, then spread with jam before topping it with a generous dollop of clotted cream. Sometimes treacle (Golden Syrup) would be used instead of jam; this combination goes by the name of “thunder and lightning” and although I’m not a big fan of treacle straight from the tin, it tasted — and the name sounded — rather good!

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